Original manufacturer of GYRODYNE Helicopter's QH-50 unmanned aerial vehicles are used to
acquire intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data using autonomous control.  We are the
sole provider of parts, service and technical assistance to US Department of Defense,
EADS Germany, and worldwide users of QH-50



For additional information regarding the new NIGHT PANTHER (the leaner and meaner UAV, its
capabilities and specifications), and the new QHX-60 drone helicopter with 24ft improved rotor and
transmission system with Rolls Royce C47 gas turbine and lift capacity of 3,000lbs.,
please contact us at:  
E-mail:  gyrodyneca@aol.com
This page is specifically designed to educate the general public about Vincent Bendix helicopters and
GYRODYNE Company of America Inc. history.
Vincent Bendix, a true pioneer and the inventor of the American coaxial helicopter with yaw control through the rotor system with
aerodynamic pedals.  
He applied in 1943 and was awarded the US patent # 2456485 in 1948.  Unfortunately he died in 1945 at the age of 62.

This helicopter was part of the bankcrupcy purchase by New York businessman,
Peter J. Papadakos, along with the model J, both in flying condition.
Only two changes were made to the half section of the fuselage and the name, from
"Bendix" to "GYRODYNE Model 2C", claiming it to be his own design.
Model K - NX 41817 ; First flew in 1946
Source:retromechanix.com
"I WISH YOU THE COMPLIMENTS OF THE SEASON AND A FLIGHT AT AN EARLY
DATE IN THIS HELICOPTER -  A PREVIEW OF MY INVENTION" SIGNED VINCENT
BENDIX 1943-1944
- An original Bendix Christmas card -
They promised us a flying car !!!!
Also the only known footage in existence of the Bendix model J flying at Bendix facility in
Stratford, Connecticut in 1948.  
Predecessor of the GYRODYNE XRON helicopter, Mr. Vincent Bendix sitting on its own invention after
flight demonstration ; 7/24/1945.  Immediately on his right is Mr. Barnes and on the left side the
gentleman in the rear is Mr. Barbour, along with other board members. Unfortunately Mr. Bendix died
right after this photo was taken at the age of 62.  

This helicopter was fully controllable through the rotor system with aerodynamic brake pedals
(see photo on the right).

Some museums and non-profit organizations masquerading as authorities on the history of Bendix
and GYRODYNE are misleading the general public by false and inaccurate statements ; the perfect
example above. Some museums claimed that this coaxial Bendix helicopter was a synchronized
one-man coaxial helicopter using a "down wash" tail planes to control the craft.
See photo on the right.  
This coaxial helicopter was controlled through aerodynamics pedals built in the rotor blades. Also,
Model J, which eventually became Gyrodyne Model 2C had a differential collective for yaw control.
This is the aerodynamic brake for yaw control as invented by Mr. Vincent
Bendix, the predecessor of the GYRODYNE tip brake;
Bendix patent # 2,456,485 applied for in 1943. Photo date 8/8/1945.
The aerodynamic brake for yaw control mechanism was patented by
Bendix ; patent # 2,456,485 applied for in November 1943.
THE ONLY KNOWN PHOTO OF THE BENDIX MODEL G THAT SUPPOSEDLY NEVER EXISTED
WITH CONTINENTAL 4 CYL ENGINE 100HP ; 11/27/1945.
VINCENT HUGO BENDIX

Vincent Bendix was born in 1882 to Swedish immigrants
in Moline, Illinois. He was always mechanically inclined,
and left home at 16 to seek his fortune in New York. He
worked a series of day jobs and studied mechanical
engineering at night. In 1901, he designed and built a
unique frame motorcycle that landed him a job with
Glenn Curtiss, builder of Triumph motorcycles.  By 1931
over 5,500 U.S. patents have been granted to him.  

We take so many things for granted today but we owe so
much to Vincent Bendix for all of his inventions including
the automotive electric starter, 4 wheel brakes, and he
even invented the washing machine !
THE ARMY-NAVY "E" AWARD


Bendix aviation received 20 "E" awards during the war,
believed to be the most received by any wartime supplier.

And for all his work in the aviation field, Mr. Vincent
Bendix was inducted into the aviation hall of fame in
1991.

CONTRIBUTION: American Institute of Aeronautics and
Astronautics
VINCENT HUGO BENDIX (1882-1945)
The father of the American Coaxial Helicopter with yaw control through the rotor system with aerodynamic pedals  
Bendix Helicopters occupied a building on East Main Street in Stratford, Connecticut, USA from 1945 to 1949.  
A part of the town's history that is unknown to most of the area's population.
Vincent Bendix became famous in automotive fields for inventing an automobile starter motor drive and after that, the four wheel automotive brake system.  From there he went to
manufacturing aircraft instruments and by 1936, he had become very rich and was sponsoring air races and competitions.  Originated in 1931, the Bendix Trophy became a highly
honored award for aviation excellence.  Jimmie Doolittle won the first Bendix race and trophy for his transcontinental flight from California to the Cleveland Air Races at a speed of 223
miles per hour.  Other winners for the cross-country flight were such famous aviation figures as Louise Thaden and Jacqueline Cochran.After Mr. Bendix's retirement, the Bendix
Corporation founded the Bendix Aviation Division in 1944.  This small organization in Detroit developed several aircraft, including a 2 place all metal light plane and an amphibian.  For
a variety of reasons, none of these aircraft obtained certification by the government or went into production.Helicopters mc was founded in 1943, encouraged by the growing success of
helicopters manufactured by Sikorsky.  The name was changed to Bendix Helicopter, Inc. in 1944.  After Mr. Bendix died in March 1945, the company was reorganized and moved the
operations to Stratford, where a labor force with aircraft, especially helicopter, experience was more available now that the war has ended.Initially occupying a small building just north
of the railroad, they subsequently built a 10,000 square foot factory for helicopter production. The first Bendix helicopter design proposed was the two place Model G. It was to have a
coaxial main rotor system, eliminating the need for a tail rotor, and be powered by a single 165 horsepower engine. While this proposed design was never built, the Model K (NX41817)
was their demonstrator/prototype that first flew in 1946. This 2,000 pound gross weight helicopter with a 25 foot coaxial rotor system was powered by a single 100 horsepower engine.
Their test pilot was Les Morris who had helped pioneer the Sikorsky helicopters as an early test pilot. The next year a larger Model L with four seats was constructed.
By early 1948 100 hours of flight testing had been accumulated on the Model J.
Due to lack of sales and capital, in January 1947 the large factory building was sold to Manning, Maxwell and Moore, who were taken over by Dresser Industries in 1949. By September,
1949, Bendix Helicopter was forced to close. In an auction the assets of the company were sold for $4,100 to Gyrodyne, lnc, St. James, Long Island, New York. Gyrodyne continued
development of the Helicopters, Inc, Model J as the G.C.A. Model 2.

Contribution: Connecticut Air+Space Center
This site is protected by copyright and trademark laws under U.S. and International laws.
Property of Gyrodyne Helicopters, Inc.
All rights reserved
Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited
GYRODYNE HELICOPTERS, INC.
Hosting by Yahoo Web Hosting
Model J - NX 74102 ; Original configuration at Bendix facility
This helicopter was equipped with a differential collective for yaw control
Source:retromechanix.com
Original blueprints of Bendix model J
Source:retromechanix.com
Bendix original document Model J
Source:retromechanix.com